What Information Does My Attorney Need to Prepare My Case?

The initial meeting with a personal injury attorney is a time to tell your story and find out your options. The attorney will need information only you can give, and bringing that information with you in an organized way puts you a step ahead. Once the facts are laid out before the lawyer, a case strategy will be developed. Issues of causation and liability will be examined, and analysis of the damage caused will be made. Depending on the type of accident, you may have both bodily injury as well as damage to your personal property. Estimates of auto repairs are helpful in calculating the total amount you are out financially. Doctor’s notes, treatment plans and invoices are also necessary to reach an accurate total of damages.

To adequately prepare your case, the type of injury is relevant. Auto accidents are one of the most common types of accidents causing personal injury. Here is a list of things that are helpful to your attorney when seeking compensation in an auto accident case:

  • A copy of the police report, if one was made
  • Photos of the scene, including pictures of the position of the vehicles and any damage suffered
  • The date, time and location of the accident
  • The names of all witnesses
  • Insurance information for all drivers involved in the accident
  • Names of treating physicians, and dates seen

When you can paint a clear picture of what happened, it helps your attorney understand the significance of the injuries. Having a thorough understanding of the incident also helps when it comes time to prepare the lawsuit. The documents prepared for your case include papers that essentially retell the story of what happened. The more information you provide about the accident, the more information your attorney can put in the lawsuit and also give to the adjuster working your case.

If you have been injured in an accident, call experienced Virginia and Washington D.C. personal injury attorneys at Hartel, DeSantis & Howie, LLP. Gather the evidence and bring it to your free initial consultation.

By Michael A. DeSantis | Published April 27, 2014